The Attic Hatch in Your Tempe Home: If It's Not Sealed, You're Not Done InsulatingInsulating and draft-proofing your home is not enough to make it energy efficient. You need to pay attention to detail. One important and often overlooked source of leakage is the attic hatch. Quite often this is passed over in renovation projects, leaving you with a single thin sheet of plywood resting in a badly-fitting frame. An uninsulated attic hatch can suck air out of your house like a chimney.Spend five minutes checking your attic hatch
It will only take you a few minutes to determine if you’re losing energy via your attic hatch. First locate the hatch and give it a visual check. Does it look well fitted? Are there any dark stains near any of the joints or trim that could indicate air leakage? Next, close all doors and windows in the vicinity and turn on the furnace or air conditioner unit. Move a smoking joss stick around the trim and watch what happens to the smoke. If there’s a problem, you’ll see the smoke immediately dragged into a crack. After that, you need to open the attic hatch to see if it has already been fitted with insulation.

How to fix it
Use an off-cut of rigid foam insulation and attach it to the attic side of the hatch with duct tape. Sometimes the hatch may have already been insulated, but only with a thin layer. If this is the case, you can always fix a second layer of rigid insulation on top. Next, use self-adhesive foam tape around the edges of the panel to create a proper seal. Finally, carry out the joss stick test again and make any adjustments necessary. This simple DIY job is well worth taking the time to do since it can help reduce your heating costs.

For more expert advice about how best to seal your attic hatch, as well as other issues related to home comfort, contact the Phoenix air conditioning repair team Wolff Mechanical. We’ve been serving the Tempe and Phoenix areas since 1978.

Our goal is to help educate our customers in the Phoenix Valley area of Arizona about energy and home comfort issues (specific to HVAC systems). 

Image courtesy of Shutterstock