Controlling Heat Gain in Your Phoenix Home Is Important Most of the YearHeat coming into your home is expected during the summer, but you can control how much. Minimizing heat gain is important if you want to save some wear and tear on your A/C, and more importantly, your energy bills. There are many ways you can lower heat gain during warm weather.

Block the Windows

Did you know that about half of heat gain in a typical home comes from the sun shining through windows? You can easily reduce this source of heat gain by covering up your windows, especially those facing the sun. Use blinds or shades on the inside, or use plants and shade screens on the outside.

Some homes don’t have a big issue with heating through windows because they have windows with low shading coefficients. Look for this aspect of windows the next time you put new ones in.

Improve Insulation

Insulation is important if you want to reduce heat coming through the walls and roof. Have a professional contractor take a look at your wall and ceiling insulation. You want to aim to have a exterior wall insulation R-value of at least 19, and a ceiling insulation R-value of at least 30.

Heat can also seep in through leaks in windows and doors. Spend some time checking for leaks once a year and fill them with weatherstripping or caulking as appropriate. If you’re really serious about leak finding, call in a professional so they can do a blower door test.

Check the Ventilation

What many homeowners don’t know is that their attics get extremely hot in the summer. Without sufficient ventilation, the heat gets trapped, which heats your home and also damages your roofing. Have a professional evaluate your attic ventilation and make recommendations if it is not up to par.

If you need professional help keeping your Phoenix home cool, contact the local HVAC experts at Wolff Mechanical.

Our goal is to help educate our customers in the Phoenix Valley area of Arizona about energy and home comfort issues (specific to HVAC systems). 

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