How's Your Attic Insulation? Checked Its Efficiency Lately?

Inefficient or not enough insulation in the attic can lead to higher home temperatures, as the heat energy from the sun as it beats down on the roof will radiate through it, raising the temperature of the attic. The heat then moves through the attic floor and into the living spaces. As a result, your A/C will run longer cycles to overcome the heat gain. High attic temperatures may also lead to damage to the structure, possibly causing moisture issues too. To ensure a lasting, durable attic as well as comfortable home temperatures and energy savings–in any season–it pays to give attic insulation some attention.

The health and efficiency of the attic largely depends on air sealing strategies, insulation and ventilation. When making improvements to the insulation there, it’s best to consult with an HVAC professional, who can help you create a balanced system in the attic, and ensure that insulation levels meet energy-efficiency guidelines.

Knowing how much insulation to use requires knowledge of the attic’s complex systems, as well as calculating insulation levels according to the type used. For instance, the Department of Energy Recommends that homeowners use up to R-60 insulation (“R” shows the material’s ability to resist heat) in an uninsulated attic, and an R-value up to 38 when adding more insulation. The R-value and amounts also depends on the type of insulation used. For instance, batt and loose-fill insulation generally have an R-value of 3.2 per inch, while mineral wool has an R-value of 3.1. Your contractor will evaluate the condition of the existing insulation, and calculate appropriate amounts according to the type of insulation best suited to the space.

To work with one of the friendly professionals at Wolff Mechanical to improve attic insulation, give us a call today! Serving Phoenix Valley homeowners.


Our goal is to help educate our customers in the Phoenix Valley area of Arizona about energy and home comfort issues (specific to HVAC systems). 

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